Friday, April 27, 2007

The New Spertus Lightens Up (Genesis 1-3)


Photos and quotes from a press preview of Krueck and Sexton's spectacular new Spertus Institute, which brings Chicago's Michigan Avenue historic district into the 21st Century. Read and see it all here.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Shiny glass envelopes have been around for decades. They're generally unimaginative. I don't see why anyone would associate them with the 21st century.

Lynn Becker said...

I guess for some people "shiny glass envelopes" all look alike, but you have to be pretty blind not to see how this one is different.

Donna said...

Absolutely gorgeous.

And not at all a typical glass envelope. For those who know K&S's work (which I'm guessing anonymous does not), their detailing is impeccable, which in itself sets their glass curtain wall apart from others, even without the simple faceting.

Excellent reporting for those that can't visit it yet, thank you!

Joe said...

anyone knows who is the curtain wall consultant for this job?

Lynn Becker said...

full technical credits here:

W.E. O’Neil Construction (General Contractor), A. Epstein and Sons (Civil Engineering), VOA (Associate Architect), Reuben Eytan of Israel (Protective Building Consultants), Schuler & Shook (Theater Design and Lighting), Kirkegaard (Acoustics), Environmental Systems Design (Data and Telecommunications), Atelier Ten (Environmental Design), Anders Dahlgren (Library Consultant), Harriet Stratis (Museum Collection Consultant), Charles Sparks + Company (Retail Design), Studiolab (Wayfinding), and Redmoon Theater Artistic Director Jim Lasko and Design Consultant Odile Compagnon (Exhibition Design for the Children’s Center).

Anonymous said...

Do take a walk on East 57th Street in New York and check out the "faceted façade" on Christian Portzamparc's LVMH Tower, between Fifth and Madison: the influence (not to use a stronger word) on the new Spertus is instantly apparent ...

Anonymous said...

I am familiar with, and am a fan of Krueck & Sexton's work, and their immaculate detailing. However, I agree with Anonymous' last comment. The similarities to Portzamparc's LVMH building in NYC are obvious, and I believe the facade is less sophisticated, and a bit more contrived, than its NYC counterpart. Nevertheless, it is a huge triumph of the Spertus Institute, the city of Chicago and modern architecture in general, to succeed in having such a building constructed in the Landmark district of South Michigan Avenue. Bravo to the team!

Robert Salm said...

I find it odd that so much energy was spent on the “institute,” yet Chicago STILL does not have one city-sponsored Holocaust memorial. I visited the Spertus Institute years ago, and I did not find the existing building or its exhibition spaces very appealing. Even with the nearby hotels, that particular stretch of South Michigan Avenue gets iffy after dark. It boggles my mind why they chose to stay in that less-traveled part of South Michigan Avenue rather than move to a more prominent location in the River North area where the Institute could have created something more functional and interesting.